Sheltering in Place – Day 53

On May 8, 75 years ago today, World War II was virtually over, particularly in Europe. I want to salute those who went before us, those who suffered and sacrificed their lives during that awful time. To all of those who served, whether on the front lines or at home, we thank you. Below is part of an email hubby’s friend sent out commemorating the day’s importance, shown in the songs of the time. He has graciously allowed me to pass it on. It was a time largely bereft of happy memories, but the music of the time was a comforting factor…to both the troops fighting the war and to their loved ones at home. During the Nazi rule, radio ownership in Germany rose from 4 to 16 million households. By 1940, 80% of American households owned a radio and, although the radio could be used to boost American morale, the American government censored radio channels in fear that enemy agents could send coded messages masked as song requests. [The BBC’s Radio Londres was operated by the Free French and actually broadcast appeals to the French to rise up, as well as instructions coded as “personal messages” to the French Resistance.] Many World War I songs had centered on propaganda, morale, and patriotism; those in World War II focused more on romance, sentimentalism and strength. Songs that were overly patriotic or militaristic were often rejected by the public. [Wikipedia] Here are just a few of the songs and artists of the day: “Bugle Call Rag”, written by Jack Pettis, Billy Meyers and Elmer Schoebel, it was first recorded by the New Orleans Rhythm Kings in 1922 as “Bugle Call Blues”.   The tune was popularized as a standard in renditions by Benny Goodman [playing it here in 1936], and Glenn Miller. Duke Ellington, The Chocolate…

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